by Pastor David Carson

Once again, on Saturday, July 7th, London was treated to the annual display of depravity parading through the streets. Once again, a small band of faithful Christians lifted up their voices and Scriptural banners and once again the denizens of New Sodom did their best to drown out the preaching and obscure the banners. However, the Word of God was clearly heard and seen in spite of all the efforts to prevent this.

The policing was generally somewhat better than last year, and we were provided with an enclosed area which wasn’t invaded by those wishing to disrupt the witness. However, one individual with an amplifier and saxophone did his best to prevent the Gospel being heard. Even though he was pushing his loudspeaker, virtually into the face of one witnessing, the police refused to act. Those witnessing took matters into their own hands by holding their banners close to the loudspeaker until the individual gave up.

There was a crowd of young people, mostly girls, in front of us, dancing frenetically to thumping music. Some were engaged in useful conversations. One young man came along to oppose the witness but as he listened to the preaching he decided not to and had a conversation with Rev. Peter Simpson and took some literature. Others had useful conversations as well.

For the second year running a number of women, masquerading as Christians, stood in front of us and tried to block our banners. They had emblazoned on their jumpers “Christian and Proud”. When challenged about the contradiction of such a slogan they had no coherent answer. One of our people said to one of them, who was trying to block our banners, “If you are a Christian, why are you blocking the Word of God?” There was no reply. Another woman had a banner stating, “Nowt So Queer As Methodists”. Rev Simpson challenged her and reminded her that John Wesley had condemned sodomy in no uncertain terms. He told her that to be a Methodist was to follow the method of the Word of God.

The day was extremely hot and one of those witnessing fainted. Others were close to following suit. A liaison policeman was most kind and helpful. He waited around until we were ready to go. He even went into a hotel to get a water bottle refilled for us. This was in contrast to those who were supposedly protecting us.

About thirty turned up to witness, a number of which hadn’t been before. This was very encouraging. All in all, we felt it was a worthwhile witness and, in spite of police reluctance to do their duty, it wasn’t disrupted like last year.